Chiropractic assessment

Why should you see a chiropractor?

With the likes of Google and social media readily available to most people, it’s fairly easy to find news and information about what chiropractors do nowadays. Despite this, I still see a surprising number of people who are unsure of the conditions we can help with and our level of skill, qualification, and competency.

Chiropractic is a health care profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system and the effects of these disorders on general health (World Health Organisation, 2005).

In 2005 when I decided to train to become a chiropractor, I assumed that because it wasn’t seen as ‘mainstream’ medicine that it wouldn’t be too difficult. I was very wrong. As part of our training, we had to complete a four year full-time undergraduate Masters of Chiropractic degree which included extremely high standards of education in anatomy, neurology, physiology, radiology, psychology and general diagnosis. We also spent many, many (many!) hours learning specialised manual (hands-on) methods such as joint and soft tissue manipulation and exercise rehab. There were no weekend courses here!

In the final year, those that passed a stringent entrance exam worked within a training clinic for 12 months with the general public. We needed to see 40 new patients and perform 400 treatments within this time, as well as write up the cases and present them to tutors, attend lectures, revise for exams, write a dissertation and create a reflective portfolio. Then, after passing an even tougher clinic exit exam, you were considered as competent to go out into the wider world.

Completing the degree was really just the beginning though. Like all healthcare providers, chiropractors are always learning! Every year the General Chiropractic Council check that chiropractors continue their professional development (CPD), and that we have appropriate qualifications, adhere to competency and criminal records checks, and have professional indemnity insurance. All of this helps to ensure that patients are protected and get the best care possible.

In short, you should see a chiropractor because they know what they are doing. They safely help millions of people a year worldwide with their nerve, muscle or joint problems, and you can be re-assured that you are in good hands.

If you need help, then come and see what our chiropractors in Stafford and Newport can do for you. We look forward to seeing you.

Chris Mallett
Principal Chiropractor, Pure Health Chiropractic & Wellness (Stafford and Newport)

Win a free massager!

WIN A HOME MASSAGER!

IT’S CHRISTMAS COMPETITION TIME! Pure Health Chiropractic Stafford and Newport are giving one of our lucky clients the chance to win a Dr Graeme Professional Strength General Purpose Massager worth around £50 RRP.

To enter the competition to win a FREE massager, all you have to do between 24th November 2017 and the closing date is:

✅ SHARE and LIKE either of our Facebook pages (see bottom of page) OR
✅ REVIEW our services on one of our Google+ pages (only 5 star reviews will count!)

Competition closes noon 12pm Friday 15th December 2017 with winner being announced on our website, Facebook, and Google pages the following Monday 18th December 2017. Pick up only from our Stafford or Newport clinics.

For more information about the massager, plese visit http://www.drgraeme.com/GP_mass.php

Good luck!

Is your sacro-iliac joint causing pain?

Is your Sacro-Iliac joint causing your back, hip or leg pain?

In this blog, our Stafford and Newport chiropractor talks about the Sacro-Iliac joint. But, what on earth is a sacro-iliac joint I hear you ask?

Well, the clue is in the name to a certain degree – it’s the joint that connects the sacrum at the base of the spine, to the ilium of the pelvis (hence sacro-iliac). It is essential in effectively distributing forces from the spine to the hips and lower limbs (and vice versa), but it can also be an often overlooked pain source in lower back injuries.

The sacro-iliac joint (or SIJ for short) is normally a fantastically strong and stable joint, and can tolerate amazing amounts of downward force to create stability when we lift or move. This stability is largely generated by well-controlled contraction of the surrounding muscles and tissue creating “closure” of the joint. Problems arise when this balance isn’t adequate, the joint is not sufficiently stable, and tissues or cartilage become damaged as a result. This can be acute (sudden) or could be chronic (long term and recurring), but in all cases it tends to hurt quite a lot.

Pain originating from the sacro-iliac joint is often confusing as it can be mistaken for injuries to other structures. For example, acute SIJ pain can often refer to the buttocks and down the back of the leg mimicking sciatica or disc symptoms. It could also refer to the groin and anterior thigh, mimicking hip arthritis. Or it could simply radiate to the spine, mimicking a facet joint issue.

Often with long term and recurrent problems, repeated flare-ups are caused by either too much movement (hypermobility) or too little movement (hypomobility) of the joint. Both can respond well to rehab and/or chiropractic adjustments and it is important to determine possible faulty muscle activation around the pelvis, and improve these as necessary.

In all cases, it is vital to get checked out by a qualified and experienced spinal professional such as a chiropractor. We will assess and treat not only the painful symptoms, but also look to address the underlying causes. Remember: Good spinal function is essential for movement; Good movement is essential for health; Chiropractic helps to maintain good spinal function.

If you need help, then come and see what chiropractic and massage can do for you. We look forward to seeing you.

Chris Mallett
Pure Health Chiropractic & Wellness – Stafford and Newport

Featured image by RadsWiki (RadsWiki) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons